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Snapshot - Part One

Since the new year began, Cornish Ramblings has taken folks out on a grand total of 35 rambles, which also means we have explored 35 corners of Cornwall: from St Agnes, Caerhays, Brown Willy, Perranporth, Gorran Haven, Budock Water, and Lanhydrock to Tintagel, Kynance, Veryan, Lizard Point, Carn Brea, Lelant, Bude, and Mullion (and more)...there isn't a part of Cornwall that, eventually, our boots won't have touched!

In this blog, I thought I'd share some of those adventures from the start of the year to give you a little snapshot of what you can expect when joining us on a ramble. And to those who have been on a hike with Cornish Ramblings and are featured in these snaps, enjoy looking back at the adventures we have been on together so far.

Part two and three will follow soon as there are lots of adventures we've had over the months, including a few more still to come throughout November and December.


I have also written a few specific blogs on our rambles way back in January which you can find on the Cornish Ramblings website here: blogs and more


But for now, sit back and enjoy just a few of our rambles throughout 2022...



Chapel Porth to Trevaunance Cove

6-miles, moderate

This route really does leave you breathless; not just because of the slight clambers to the top of the coast path, but mainly because of those magnificent views which await you. The entire first half of this walk takes you along the coast and although the second half brings you a little inland, you will be rewarded with the return of the coast at the end as you make your way back to the car park.


This ramble was a special one in partnership with ACAI Outdoorwear and International Women's Day 2022 and you can read all about it here in my blog: International Women's Day 2022


Trebarwith Strand to Tintagal

5.5-miles, moderate

This five and a bit mile ramble took us from Trebarwith Strand and along the coast to the very picturesque Tintagel. It was a lot windier than anticipated so, there were a few hairy moments as we scaled the side of the cliff around to Tintagel. But I’m glad to report everyone made it back in one piece.


As well as being breathtakingly beautiful with her striking coastline and azure sea, this ramble also wins top prize for the most stiles along one route…including some that were not the easiest to get over so, please bear this in mind if you decide to check this walk out yourselves, and definitely if you’re taking dogs as some require lifting over AND one has barbed wire along the top which is very naughty!


Nare Head to Portloe

5.2-miles, moderate to strenuous

This ramble really did pack a punch and left the ole thighs burning from a few fairly steep inclines along the coast. This walk, albeit strenuous in places, can be forgiven when you see the views at the top. Taking in views of The Roseland as well as seeing snippets of our heritage around the nuclear bunker, this route is something else and one that my ramblers absolutely loved (once they'd gotten their breath back!). Our midway respite took us to the quaint fishing village of Portloe, where we sat and watched the waves whilst munching on our sarnies. Perfection!


Helford to Dennis Head

4.6-miles, easy to moderate

Not all our rambles are coastal. Although these particular walks are the most popular I have noticed, I do like to include a few woodland walks throughout the year when I can. This particular walk was a beauty and allowed us to explore the creeks of the Helford River, and the small settlements around St Anthony and Mannacan.


St Agnes Head to Wheal Coates

3-miles, easy to moderate

If you’re looking to explore on foot an area where you’ll have nothing but wide eyes and slack jaws, the north coast is where it’s at. Specifically, in my opinion, between Chapel Porth and St Agnes.

During the months when the heathland is popping with colour against the crisp sky and bejewelled sea, there really is no other place I’d rather spend my spare time, than up on St Agnes Head.

This entire stretch of coast nestles against a gargantuan expanse of blue, and is a place I will usually gravitate to when in need of realigning.


Predannack to Kynance

4.7-miles, moderate

A popular section of Cornwall and one I love to explore, Predannack to Kynance is a magical circular walk through the Lizard National Nature Reserve. Although it was a tad overcast at times, every single one of us were like kids at a bouncy-castle party because around every corner, we were greeted with drop dead gorgeous views to get excitable about.


On finally arriving at the majestic Kynance Cove, I let everyone pootle off to do their own thing for about twenty minutes, before congregating at the designated meeting point to continue on the final leg of our ramble. Not a bad place to sit and eat your lunch!


Perranporth to Trevellas

5.5-miles, moderate

There is something quite eerily magical about walking through the sea mist, the occasional pop of pink from the sea thrift scattering the coastline, and the whoosh of the invisible sea below...which was exactly what we were treated to on this particular ramble back in May, as we made our way along the rugged coast path from Perranporth to Trevellas.


Although the views were a little filtered, the smiles on my ramblers faces and the endless chinwagging let me know they were still having a wonderful time. After a pitstop in the memorial gardens we finished our misty walk with a much-needed coffee from Tywarnhayle Inn and then the biggest ice cream I have ever seen/eaten/held from Pavilion Ice!


Lanhydrock

3.8-miles, easy to moderate

This was an absolute beauty of a woodland walk. I took 25 of my ramblers for a picturesque stomp from Lanhydrock to Respryn and the bluebells were out, the trees full of life, the flowers popped against the blue sky, a babbling river a welcome respite for the dogs, the views magnificent as we got to the top of a slight incline, and excitable chitchat and laughter was a-plenty.


It was a small but mighty ramble - four miles of colours and sounds and smells - all your senses awoke and felt completely alive throughout this divine walk. We stopped for about twenty minutes at Lanhydrock House where we used the facilities and sat down in the grass, admiring the precision-cut bushes and majestic buildings of the estate. You can stop here at the cafe if you wish - we decided the carry on for the half a mile we had left to the car park where some of us departed, and some of us stayed a little longer.


The dog-friendly cafe by the main car park was our final pit stop. Several of us found a spot on the grass and relaxed with our coffees and sandwiches before saying goodbye and going on our merry ways.


Trelissick

5-miles, easy to moderate

This beautiful figure-of-eight National Trust themed ramble around Trelissick is a super popular route with my ramblers. I tend to organise a walk here around twice a year because it really is a magical place, and one I have spent many an hour whiling away on foot via the trails of the river-lined paths, and many a moment dipping myself in the gentle rhythms of the water down at the beach.


After a ramble, there is the opportunity for a wander around the estate and a yummy cake and coffee in the cafe. The best way to end a ramble in my opinion!



That's all for now...

There are a gazillion more adventures to be shared with you, all of which I will share in parts two and three over the coming months. But here is a little snapshot to whet your whistle of where our boots have traversed throughout the year, and where you could explore too if you joined us.


Instagram and Facebook are also where I share our adventures so if you aren't already following us there, please pop across today and give us a follow. I tend to share something most days!


Keep your eyes peeled for the next installment of our rambling snapshots and until then, I will maybe see some of you out there on the trails.

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